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Developing Porous Airbrushed Nanofiber Scaffolds

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Date Issued:
2016
Abstract/Description:
Fiber scaffolds mimic the three-dimensional fibrous nature of the native extracellular matrix in connective tissues. They offer a high degree of interconnected porosity for cell and tissue infiltration in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Fiber composition and architecture can be tailored to more closely model the physiological cellular microenvironment to study cell processes in a laboratory setting. Previous work has focused on the technique of electrospinning to fabricate microfiber scaffolds. However, as fiber diameters decrease into the nanoscale, electrospun scaffolds are too tightly packed to allow sufficient cell penetration into the fiber mesh. This work investigates a novel application of airbrushing, using compressed nitrogen gas to release a polymer solution to form loosely packed bundles of nanofibers. This versatile airbrushing technique can be used to deposit nanofibers onto a broad range of targets, and has been shown to produce scaffolds with larger pores in comparison to electrospinning. In this study, the effect of process parameters on scaffold porosity, fiber diameter, and pore size is explored in order to fabricate scaffolds with consistent fiber architecture for cellular studies. Nanofiber bundles have been confirmed morphologically through light microscopy, with porosity measurements forthcoming.
Title: Developing Porous Airbrushed Nanofiber Scaffolds.
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Name(s): Knight, Roshonda, author
STEM Undergraduate Research Symposium
Type of Resource: text
Issuance: single unit
Date Issued: 2016
Physical Form: PDF
Language(s): English
eng
Abstract/Description: Fiber scaffolds mimic the three-dimensional fibrous nature of the native extracellular matrix in connective tissues. They offer a high degree of interconnected porosity for cell and tissue infiltration in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Fiber composition and architecture can be tailored to more closely model the physiological cellular microenvironment to study cell processes in a laboratory setting. Previous work has focused on the technique of electrospinning to fabricate microfiber scaffolds. However, as fiber diameters decrease into the nanoscale, electrospun scaffolds are too tightly packed to allow sufficient cell penetration into the fiber mesh. This work investigates a novel application of airbrushing, using compressed nitrogen gas to release a polymer solution to form loosely packed bundles of nanofibers. This versatile airbrushing technique can be used to deposit nanofibers onto a broad range of targets, and has been shown to produce scaffolds with larger pores in comparison to electrospinning. In this study, the effect of process parameters on scaffold porosity, fiber diameter, and pore size is explored in order to fabricate scaffolds with consistent fiber architecture for cellular studies. Nanofiber bundles have been confirmed morphologically through light microscopy, with porosity measurements forthcoming.
Identifier: fgcu_UGR_0037 (IID)
Note(s): Poster from the 2016 STEM Undergraduate Research Symposium. Research Mentors: Jiehong Liao, Ph.D., R. Christopher Geiger, Ph.D.
Subject(s): Airbrush
Scaffold
Porosity.
Tissue engineering.
Nanofibers.
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fgcu/fd/fgcu_UGR_0037
Use and Reproduction: In Copyright - Educational Use Permitted In Copyright - Educational Use Permitted
Owner Institution: FGCU

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