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GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM: PARENTAL VIEW ON EFFICACY OF GPS TRACKING DEVICES FOR CHILDREN’S MOVEMENT

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Date Issued:
2016
Abstract:
This study was designed to identify how likely will parents or caregivers use a GPS device (Global Positioning System) for prepubescent children for safety purposes. This original research could be a step closer to child safety and prevention from children going missing. Studies show that the first three hours are the most critical when trying to locate a missing child, and death most likely occurs in the first three hours of the abduction. Previous research on GPS tracking devices for children emerged into trust issues, device performances, child's location-time pattern, the evolution of technology used from an infant to the prepubescent, or understanding children's everyday mobility. No research has been done in U.S. on parental view on GPS devices for child protection when they travel or spend time unescorted. This study analyzed 101 surveys completed by parents or caregivers of children age 6 to 11 years old. As an instrument of measurement, the researcher used a survey addressed to parents of school children 6 to 11 years old, which was distributed through the Survey Monkey Audience website. The majority of the participants in this study is not using a device for child safety (81%). In contrast with the results of the study conducted in the UK (Vasalou, Oostveen, and Joinson, 2012), where parents willing to use these technologies with their children were a minority, whereas in U.S., parents or caregivers willing to use GPS devices for child safety were not a minority (83%). About 50% of the total respondents reported that it is very or somewhat likely to use a monitoring device for child safety. Still, there is a lack of parental knowledge about the GPS devices designed for child safety (33% are familiar with these devices). This study could be a contribution to the body of knowledge working to protect children. Could be a reference for parents to better understand the functionality of these devices, and for tracking device manufacturers to acknowledge and adapt the products to consumer's necessity. This study could be used as a reference for other researchers that are going to complete work in this area of study.
Title: GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM: PARENTAL VIEW ON EFFICACY OF GPS TRACKING DEVICES FOR CHILDREN’S MOVEMENT.
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Name(s): Albu, Gabriela
Type of Resource: text
Issuance: single unit
Date Issued: 2016
Physical Form: Thesis
Extent: 68 pgs.
Language(s): English
Abstract: This study was designed to identify how likely will parents or caregivers use a GPS device (Global Positioning System) for prepubescent children for safety purposes. This original research could be a step closer to child safety and prevention from children going missing. Studies show that the first three hours are the most critical when trying to locate a missing child, and death most likely occurs in the first three hours of the abduction. Previous research on GPS tracking devices for children emerged into trust issues, device performances, child's location-time pattern, the evolution of technology used from an infant to the prepubescent, or understanding children's everyday mobility. No research has been done in U.S. on parental view on GPS devices for child protection when they travel or spend time unescorted. This study analyzed 101 surveys completed by parents or caregivers of children age 6 to 11 years old. As an instrument of measurement, the researcher used a survey addressed to parents of school children 6 to 11 years old, which was distributed through the Survey Monkey Audience website. The majority of the participants in this study is not using a device for child safety (81%). In contrast with the results of the study conducted in the UK (Vasalou, Oostveen, and Joinson, 2012), where parents willing to use these technologies with their children were a minority, whereas in U.S., parents or caregivers willing to use GPS devices for child safety were not a minority (83%). About 50% of the total respondents reported that it is very or somewhat likely to use a monitoring device for child safety. Still, there is a lack of parental knowledge about the GPS devices designed for child safety (33% are familiar with these devices). This study could be a contribution to the body of knowledge working to protect children. Could be a reference for parents to better understand the functionality of these devices, and for tracking device manufacturers to acknowledge and adapt the products to consumer's necessity. This study could be used as a reference for other researchers that are going to complete work in this area of study.
Identifier: Albu__fgcu_1743_10193 (IID)
Note(s): Degree Awarded: Master of Science
Subject(s): GPS
child safety
tracking devices
parental view
child abduction
missing children
peace of mind
prepubescent
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fgcu/fd/Albu__fgcu_1743_10193
Use and Reproduction: All rights reserved.
Host Institution: FGCU