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Effects of lower cervical and upper thoracic mobilization on shoulder range of motion limited by shoulder range of motion limited by shoulder impingement syndrome: A case series

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Date Issued:
2010
Abstract/Description:
Based in the literature review it is hypothesized that addressing areas of hypomobility in the upper thoracic spine and cervical spine will lead to normalization of the biomechanics of the shoulder complex, thus reducing the abnormal loads placed on the shoulder and the articulations involved leading to greater range of motion within the shoulder complex. Current research is limited but seems to indicate that there is potential positive effect on SIS by addressing these spinal dysfunctions and that there is a need for further research in this area. This study will add to the growing body of evidence based research that SIS can be treated conservatively with lower cervical and upper thoracic joint mobilizations in addition to standard physical therapy interventions for SIS. The purpose of this study was to determine whether lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal manipulations are an effective way to treat SIS leading to regained range of motion within the shoulder complex. The research question of this study was: Is there a difference in treatment outcomes in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome who receive standard physical therapy treatment and manipulation to the lower cervical and upper thoracic spine compared to those who only receive the standard physical therapy treatment?
Title: Effects of lower cervical and upper thoracic mobilization on shoulder range of motion limited by shoulder range of motion limited by shoulder impingement syndrome: A case series.
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Name(s): Redman, Brandie D., author
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Thesis
Issuance: single unit
Date Issued: 2010
Physical Form: bound thesis
Extent: 28 pgs.
Language(s): English
eng
Abstract/Description: Based in the literature review it is hypothesized that addressing areas of hypomobility in the upper thoracic spine and cervical spine will lead to normalization of the biomechanics of the shoulder complex, thus reducing the abnormal loads placed on the shoulder and the articulations involved leading to greater range of motion within the shoulder complex. Current research is limited but seems to indicate that there is potential positive effect on SIS by addressing these spinal dysfunctions and that there is a need for further research in this area. This study will add to the growing body of evidence based research that SIS can be treated conservatively with lower cervical and upper thoracic joint mobilizations in addition to standard physical therapy interventions for SIS. The purpose of this study was to determine whether lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal manipulations are an effective way to treat SIS leading to regained range of motion within the shoulder complex. The research question of this study was: Is there a difference in treatment outcomes in patients with shoulder impingement syndrome who receive standard physical therapy treatment and manipulation to the lower cervical and upper thoracic spine compared to those who only receive the standard physical therapy treatment?
Identifier: fgcu_ETD_0504 (IID)
Note(s): Degree Awarded: Master of Science
Department: College of Health Professions
Subject(s): Shoulder
Shoulder pain
Shoulder joint
Shoulder impingement syndrome
Shoulder range of motion
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fgcu/fd/fgcu_ETD_0504
Use and Reproduction: Creator holds copyright.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FGCU