You are here

The Prevalence of Abnormal Vital Signs in Outpatient Physical Therapy: A Pilot Study of One Hospital System

Download pdf | Full Screen View

Date Issued:
2019-05-06
Summary:
Introduction. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of abnormal vital signs (AVS) in outpatient physical therapy, determine the percentage of those with AVS and without a previously diagnosed cardiopulmonary (CP) disease, and to observe physical therapist (PT) actions in response to vital sign (VS) values. Review of the literature. Previous research suggests many physical therapy outpatients possess CP comorbidities. Research questions and hypothesis. This research attempted to answer three questions: 1) What is the prevalence of abnormal resting VS in the outpatient setting, 2) What is the percentage of outpatients with AVS and no previous cardiopulmonary diagnosis, and 3) What actions do PTs take following VS assessment? Methods. After approval from the necessary Institutional Review Boards, documentation from outpatient physical therapy patient encounters occurring with 6 PTs was retrospectively reviewed along with associated medical records. Results. Data of 317 outpatients and 2119 patient encounters (1156 occurring with VS assessment) were included in the analysis. On average, heart rate and oxygen saturation levels in a normal range were observed for the majority of encounters. Blood pressure in a normal, elevated, stage I hypertension, and stage II hypertension, and hypertensive crisis range was present in an average of 24.6%, 22.8%, 24.1%, and 27.9%, and .08% of encounters respectively. No documented action was present in 94.5% of encounters. Discussion. Most outpatient encounters occur with AVS, regardless of absence of previous CP diagnosis. Physical therapists’ documentation suggests that frequently no action is taken following assessment. Conclusion. The high prevalence of AVS in outpatients warrants frequent VS assessment and PT action.
Title: The Prevalence of Abnormal Vital Signs in Outpatient Physical Therapy: A Pilot Study of One Hospital System.
68 views
6 downloads
Name(s): Andrews, Nathan, Author
Cochran, Raven, Author
Marieb College of Health & Human Services, Degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Research Project
Issuance: single unit
Date Issued: 2019-05-06
Extent: 58 pgs.
Language(s): English
Summary: Introduction. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of abnormal vital signs (AVS) in outpatient physical therapy, determine the percentage of those with AVS and without a previously diagnosed cardiopulmonary (CP) disease, and to observe physical therapist (PT) actions in response to vital sign (VS) values. Review of the literature. Previous research suggests many physical therapy outpatients possess CP comorbidities. Research questions and hypothesis. This research attempted to answer three questions: 1) What is the prevalence of abnormal resting VS in the outpatient setting, 2) What is the percentage of outpatients with AVS and no previous cardiopulmonary diagnosis, and 3) What actions do PTs take following VS assessment? Methods. After approval from the necessary Institutional Review Boards, documentation from outpatient physical therapy patient encounters occurring with 6 PTs was retrospectively reviewed along with associated medical records. Results. Data of 317 outpatients and 2119 patient encounters (1156 occurring with VS assessment) were included in the analysis. On average, heart rate and oxygen saturation levels in a normal range were observed for the majority of encounters. Blood pressure in a normal, elevated, stage I hypertension, and stage II hypertension, and hypertensive crisis range was present in an average of 24.6%, 22.8%, 24.1%, and 27.9%, and .08% of encounters respectively. No documented action was present in 94.5% of encounters. Discussion. Most outpatient encounters occur with AVS, regardless of absence of previous CP diagnosis. Physical therapists’ documentation suggests that frequently no action is taken following assessment. Conclusion. The high prevalence of AVS in outpatients warrants frequent VS assessment and PT action.
Identifier: fgcu_ETD_0289 (IID)
Degree Awarded: Doctorate in Physical Therapy
Department: Rehabilitation Sciences
Committee Chair: Ellen Donald, PT, Ph.D.
Committee Member: Kathleen Swanick, DPT, MS, OCS
Subject(s): Physical therapy
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fgcu/fd/fgcu_ETD_0289
Use and Reproduction: Creator(s) holds copyright.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FGCU