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THE EFFECTIVENESS OF INQUIRY-BASED VS. DIDACTIC TEACHING METHODS ON STUDENT PERFORMANCE IN UNDERGRADUATE STATISTICS

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Date Issued:
2017-05
Abstract:
This study explored the impact of instructional style in the teaching of introductory statistics on students’ attitudes towards statistics and on students’ academic outcomes in statistics courses. Four university statistics instructors were surveyed to identify their instructional style. In addition, their students’ (n=313) mean course scores and mean scores on the Learning Outcomes for Statistical Methods instrument were analyzed. Based on an independent measure of learning outcomes for students, the data indicate instructional styles that are more inquiry-based may be more effective overall for student achievement on the Learning Outcomes for Statistical Methods instrument. There was a significant decrease found between pre- and post-survey SATS-36 means for the students’ Value, Interest, and Effort component scores. This indicates students found less value, interest, and effort required for statistics after taking a statistical methods course. In addition, students who score higher on the pre-SATS-36 Affect, Cognitive, and Effort sub-scores tended to have higher final course averages. In an analysis of gender, male students view statistics more favorably than female students, male students believe statistics is more difficult than female students, and male students believe statistics requires less effort than female students. Finally, students with a higher stress level tended to have a lower Learning Outcomes for Statistical Methods average.
Title: THE EFFECTIVENESS OF INQUIRY-BASED VS. DIDACTIC TEACHING METHODS ON STUDENT PERFORMANCE IN UNDERGRADUATE STATISTICS.
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Name(s): Nichols, Robert Lee, Author
College of Education, Degree granting institution
Type of Resource: text
Genre: Dissertation
Issuance: single unit
Date Issued: 2017-05
Extent: 141 pgs.
Language(s): English
Abstract: This study explored the impact of instructional style in the teaching of introductory statistics on students’ attitudes towards statistics and on students’ academic outcomes in statistics courses. Four university statistics instructors were surveyed to identify their instructional style. In addition, their students’ (n=313) mean course scores and mean scores on the Learning Outcomes for Statistical Methods instrument were analyzed. Based on an independent measure of learning outcomes for students, the data indicate instructional styles that are more inquiry-based may be more effective overall for student achievement on the Learning Outcomes for Statistical Methods instrument. There was a significant decrease found between pre- and post-survey SATS-36 means for the students’ Value, Interest, and Effort component scores. This indicates students found less value, interest, and effort required for statistics after taking a statistical methods course. In addition, students who score higher on the pre-SATS-36 Affect, Cognitive, and Effort sub-scores tended to have higher final course averages. In an analysis of gender, male students view statistics more favorably than female students, male students believe statistics is more difficult than female students, and male students believe statistics requires less effort than female students. Finally, students with a higher stress level tended to have a lower Learning Outcomes for Statistical Methods average.
Identifier: Nichols_fgcu_1743_10252 (IID)
Degree Awarded: Doctor of Education
Department: Curriculum, Instruction & Culture
Committee Chair/Advisor: Lynn K. Wilder, Ed.D.
Committee Members: Elia Vázquez-Montilla, Ph.D.; Charles Lindsey, Ph.D.
Subject(s): Education
Learning outcomes
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fgcu/fd/Nichols_fgcu_1743_10252
Use and Reproduction: Creator holds copyright.
Use and Reproduction: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
Host Institution: FGCU