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Aquatic Therapy for a Patient Post-Stroke: A Case Report

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Date Issued:
2014
Abstract:
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States. The effects of stroke may consist of neurologic, musculoskeletal, and cognitive manifestations. Those who have had a stroke may present with barriers to conventional dry land therapy, preventing them from acquiring their full rehab potential. There is evidence that aquatic therapy may improve strength, balance, gait, range of motion, and psychological well-being; but there is little research on aquatic therapy for the stroke population specifically. The purpose of this case report is to describe the evaluation, intervention, and outcome of a patient with a history of stroke who participated in an aquatic therapy program. The patient is an 84 year-old male with right hemiplegia, resulting in impaired gait, balance, and overall functional mobility. The aquatic therapy sessions were twice a week for eight weeks and included tone reduction, gait training, balance activities, and strengthening exercises. After eight weeks, the patient demonstrated improved strength, reduced muscle tone, and decreased risk of falls as evidenced by improved scores on the Berg Balance Scale and Timed Up and Go (TUG) Test. This case report suggests that aquatic therapy may be beneficial for patients with stroke who show minimal progress with land therapy or are unable to tolerate land activities.
Title: Aquatic Therapy for a Patient Post-Stroke: A Case Report.
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Name(s): Duffy, Katey
Type of Resource: text
Issuance: single unit
Date Issued: 2014
Physical Form: Dissertation
Extent: 31 pgs
Language(s): English
Abstract: According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, stroke is the leading cause of long-term disability in the United States. The effects of stroke may consist of neurologic, musculoskeletal, and cognitive manifestations. Those who have had a stroke may present with barriers to conventional dry land therapy, preventing them from acquiring their full rehab potential. There is evidence that aquatic therapy may improve strength, balance, gait, range of motion, and psychological well-being; but there is little research on aquatic therapy for the stroke population specifically. The purpose of this case report is to describe the evaluation, intervention, and outcome of a patient with a history of stroke who participated in an aquatic therapy program. The patient is an 84 year-old male with right hemiplegia, resulting in impaired gait, balance, and overall functional mobility. The aquatic therapy sessions were twice a week for eight weeks and included tone reduction, gait training, balance activities, and strengthening exercises. After eight weeks, the patient demonstrated improved strength, reduced muscle tone, and decreased risk of falls as evidenced by improved scores on the Berg Balance Scale and Timed Up and Go (TUG) Test. This case report suggests that aquatic therapy may be beneficial for patients with stroke who show minimal progress with land therapy or are unable to tolerate land activities.
Identifier: Duffy_fgcu_1743_10063 (IID)
Note(s): Degree Awarded: Doctorate in Physical Therapy
Persistent Link to This Record: http://purl.flvc.org/fgcu/fd/Duffy_fgcu_1743_10063
Use and Reproduction: All rights reserved.
Owner Institution: FGCU